Special thanks to:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Knox-Metropolitan United Church

 

 

Regina Bell Ringers

President:     Shelleen Ross

Vice-President:  Garth Solar

Secretary/Treasurer:  Carol Benesh

 

 

www.reg.trlabs.ca/bells

 

 

For Tower Bell Tours or

Apprenticeship Information

Contact the Knox-Metropolitan at 525-9128

 

 

 

 

 

November 2012

 

The Regina Bell Ringers declare

 

 

 

F. Wayne Tunison

Master Bell Ringer

 


Concert dates:

 

 

November 12 – 11am – Apprentices

November 13 – 5:30 – Carol Benesh & Azure Benesh

November 14 – 6:30 – Anna Tunison

November 15 – noon - Candace Sundbo and Heather Britton

November 15 – 5:30 – Trevor Anderson

November 16 – noon – Wayne Tunison

 


November 12, 2012 – 11:00 am

The Apprentices

 

            Wayne Tunison’s easy going and gentle approach to teaching makes apprenticing on the bells a pleasure.  Although he sets high standards apprenticing is fun and exciting.  The bell tower is a great place to spend an hour on Sunday afternoons with the others on the bell ringing team.  The sense of comradeship and community that develops over the years in the bell tower will never be forgotten.  --- Bev Lundahl

 

            How do you take a bunch of people that have never played an instrument before and have them become proficient on the instrument when the instrument has instant broadcast to the audience?  The art of tower bell ringing involves being very aware of the environment surrounding the bell tower.  Some of your audience is what is called a captive audience. They don`t really have a choice.  Being a good neighbour and a musician means ensuring performance standards at every practice, which is a minimum of an hour per week.  There are three levels of apprentice: beginner, intermediate and senior.  Once an apprentice has passed the senior level they earn the right to be named a bell ringer. Intermediate apprentices start learning the art of running a circle and the process of ensuring music comes from the tower and not noise. By the time an apprentice becomes a senior apprentice they will know all the aspects of running the tower. 

            Once in a while there comes a person who has earned the right to become Master at their Art.  F. Wayne Tunison graduated to a bell ringer in 1967.  Over the years, every person that has passed through the Darke Memorial Chimes bell tower has been taught or toured by Wayne or someone he has mentored.  The week preceeding Queen’s day celebrations, November 17, 2012, the Regina Bell Ringers proclaim F. Wayne Tunison - Master Bell Ringer. The apprentices honour Wayne with their concert. 

 

The Apprentices

Leah Cook, Bonita Dolmage, Elona LaForge, Jill Laycock Mercedees Lenger, Bev Lundahl, Ronnie Yee, Anna Tunison, Azure Benesh, Carol Benesh

 

1.    Psalm of Approach # 45      F. Wayne Tunison (b.1953)

2.    Rochester         Charles Hylton Stewart (1884-1932)

3.    Denby                  Charles J. Dale (1860-1920)

4.    Do Do                                  French  Traditional

5.    Tallis Canon          Thomas  Tallis (1505-1585)

6.    Wachet Auf           Philipp  Nicolai (1556-1608)

7.    November Chimes           Larry John Peterson (b.1952)

8.    Paderborn                "Paderborn Gesangbuch" (b.1765)

9.    Providence   Solomon W. Straub (1842-1899)

10.  Heinlein                  Martin  Herbst (1654-1681)

11.  Old Brass Wagon           American  Traditional

12.  St. Denio                               Welsh  Traditional

13.  Kum Ba Yah             South African  Traditional

14.  Rub A Dub Dub                  English  Traditional

15.  Regent Square   Henry Thomas Smart (1813-1879)

16.  Song 34            Orlando  Gibbons (1583-1625)

17.  Mozart       Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)

18.  Plain Hunt Doubles 8 9 10 11 12      Traditional

19.  Another Amen   Larry John Peterson (b.1952)

 

 


November 13, 2012 – 5:30 pm

Azure Benesh & Carol Benesh

In 1996, when Wayne first introduced Carol to the bells, he could see that she was not comfortable with grabbing a rope and playing.  He showed her the bells, showed her how to ring but didn’t push. Even though this wasn’t for her at the time, Carol realized this was something she would like her daughters, Jade and Azure, to experience. Over the process of Jade and Azure learning to ring, Wayne asked Carol if she could take a rope for a song as it would help with the playing.  This was within Carol’s comfort zone.  After a while, Carol then asked for an apprentice sheet.  “I am up here anyway, I might as well learn”.  When this happens, we refer to Wayne as Tom Sawyer.  Helping people decide that this is something they really want to do

However, once a person has been in that comfort zone too long (read rut), Wayne also recognizes this and attempts to help them get out of it. Carol is definitely in the running for the longest apprentice. Over the years many people go through the tower.  Depending on what is going on in their lives, where they are at, people come and they go.  Wayne has let them know they are always welcome.  Wayne has helped Carol develop a passion for the bells and commit to keep the bells ringing.  Between the two of them and the bell ringing community the Darke Memorial Chimes housed in the Knox Metropolitan ring weekly (unless extreme weather conditions prevail).

Within the last two years Azure returned to the tower and is showing a passion as great as Wayne’s.  With Wayne’s influence the bell tower has a strong chance of staying open for future generations to enjoy.

 

Carol and Azure recognize F. Wayne Tunison as Master Bell Ringer and honour him with their concert.

 

 

Azure Benesh & Carol Benesh

 

1. Psalm of Approach # 60        F. Wayne Tunison (b.1953)

2. Do Do, Bady, Do                   French  Traditional

3. One, Two, Three, Alary    Canadian  Traditional

4. Lafferty                         Karen  Lafferty (b.1948)

3/4 Hour Chime      F. Wayne Tunison (b.1953)

5. Cheerful       Martin Edward Fallas Shaw (1875-1958)

6. The  Lord Is Good To Me              Kim  Gannon

7. Blanket Routine               Gloria  Mundi (b.1806)

8. Kinda Silly Interlude            Larry John Peterson (b.1952)

9. Korea                                    Korean  Traditional

1 Hour Chime         F. Wayne Tunison (b.1953)

10.     Central Collegiate Suite: Students March to War# 1

                                 F. Wayne Tunison (b.1953)

11.     Central Collegiate Suite: Students March to War# 2

                                 F. Wayne Tunison (b.1953)

12.   Les Moissonneurs        Francois  Couperin (1668-1733)

13.     Merry Bells Of England               J.  Flehman

1/4 Hour Chime       Anna Whyp Sage Tunison (b.1997)

14.     Merry Bells Of England               J.  Flehman

15.     Polyglottal Cracker        Larry John Peterson (b.1952)

16.     Royal Oak                        English  Traditional

17.     The Armed Man: A Mass for Peace (Benedictus)

                                         Karl  Jenkins (b.1944)

18.     Moment To Decide    Thomas John Williams (1869-1944)

1/2 Hour Chime                      Patrick  Johnson

19.     11-Fold Amen     F. Wayne Tunison (b.1953)

Note: Hour Chimes are approximate

 

 

 

 

 



November 14, 2012 – 6:30 pm

Anna Tunison

 

My father as a bell ringer has used the bells to influence me. He used them to teach me perseverance, a skill I am still lacking yet thanks to him have enough to keep me going. Bells have also played a role as, obviously, a musical tool that has helped me as a guide in other musical instruments. I would love to thank my dad for giving all these things and more that has shaped me into who I am today.

 

 

 

 

Anna Tunison

 

 

1. Arise, Shine          Edward Francis Rimbault (1816-1876)

2. Barefoot                  Carman J. Price (b.1972)

3. Faith of our Fathers (St. Catherine)              

     Henri Frederick Hemy (1818-1888)

4. Up Where We Belong    Buffy  Sainte-Marie (b.1941)

5. You're My Reason   Craig  Salkeid (b.1961)

6. Dwarf On A Hot Summer Night                     

              Larry John Peterson (b.1952)

7. Song For Mr. Blister      Larry John Peterson (b.1952)

8. Tradition    Frederick Robert Charles Clarke (b.1931)

9. Sweet Nothings #11     Larry John Peterson (b.1952)

10. Daydream #01            Larry John Peterson (b.1952)

11. Valerie          Larry John Peterson (b.1952)

12. Causa Divina     Frederick Robert Charles Clarke (b.1931)

13. Spiritus Vitae Mary Jane Hammond (1878-1964)

14. Bridegroom                  Peter  Cutts (b.1937)

15. Hyfrydol    Rowland Hugh Prichard (1811-1887)

16. Geneva     George Henry Day (1883-1966)

17. Plain Hunt Minimus 1 2 3 4       Traditional

18. Amen #236  Larry John Peterson (b.1952)

 

 



November 15, 2012 – noon

 

Candace Sundbo & Heather Britton

 

 

No biography available at time of publishing

 

Candace Sundbo & Heather Britton

 

 

1.    Gloria Patri                  Lawrence  Ritchey (1939-2006)

2.    Softly And Tenderly                                                     

                        William Lamartine Thompson (1847-1909)

3.    Hyfrydol            Rowland Hugh Prichard (1811-1887)

4.    Nicæa                       John Bacchus Dykes (1823-1876)

5.    Geneva                        George Henry Day (1883-1966)

6.    Franconia            Johann Balthasar Konig (1691-1758)

7.    Barefoot                                 Carman J. Price (b.1972)

8.    Old 104th                    "Ravenscroft's Psalter" (b.1621)

9.    Benedictamus Domino            Abbey Of Saint Martial (b.1125)

10.      Heathlands           Henry Thomas Smart (1813-1879)

11.      Salzburg            Johann Michael Haydn (1737-1806)

12.      Hymn Of Joy    Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)

13.      Tiptoe McGee                      Carman J. Price (b.1972)

14.      Little Things Amen      Larry John Peterson (b.1952)

 



November 15, 2012 – 5:30 pm

 

Trevor Anderson

 

 

          Began ringing tower bells as a teenager in the 90's under the tutelage of Wayne Tunison and has only grown closer to the bells since.  In 2011 he finally completed his 20 year apprenticeship and became a fully-fledged bell ringer.

 

          Don't worry, it doesn't necessarily take that long to become a ringer, Trevor just enjoys savouring the journey more than most.

 

          Other than ringing, Trevor can be located studying and working within the equally ancient art of timber-framing.  As a carpenter, his interest in sustainably built and enduring wooden structures may only be matched by his interest in resonant metallic bell-like objects.

 

          Sit back in one of Victoria Park's comfortable benches and enjoy Regina's most characteristically unique public instruments, the Darke Memorial Chimes, as played by Regina Bell Ringer Trevor Anderson honouring Master Bell Ringer Wayne Tunison.

 

Trevor Anderson

 

1.      Meditation For Bells         Stewart  Wilkinson (b.1944)

2.      Stentaway                           Clifford  Crawley (b.1929)

3.      Song Of The Sun (Ozymandias)                                   

         Paul  Kantner (b.1941) and Grace  Slick (b.1939)

4.      Fantasia On Greensleeves                                             

                          Ralph Vaughan Williams (1872-1958)

5.      Nova Nova                                     English  Traditional

6.      Cantate Domino      Thomas  Ravenscroft (1590-1633)

7.      Adam Catched Eve         Joseph  Baildon (1727-1774)

8.      Minor Plain Hunt Counting              F. Wayne Tunison (b.1953)

9.      Offshore Breeze                                    John  Hamilton

10.  The House Of The Risin' Sun     American  Traditional

11.  Mixolydian Suite For Bells (Suite I)                             

                                    Lawrence  Ritchey (1939-2006)

12.  Eskimo Chant                     Canadian Inuit  Traditional

13.  Science Fiction / Double Feature        Richard  O'brien

14.  Celebration Suite For Tower Bells     Thomas  Schudel (b.1937)

15.  Returning Hunter's Song             Canadian  Traditional

16.  Savage Wales                     F. Wayne Tunison (b.1953)

 

 


 

November 16 – Noon

 

F. Wayne Tunison

 

         I am the product of American father and British Canadian mother, therefore I chose some British and cowboy folk songs to illustrate my roots. The roots often invoke thoughts of the past and this year the Titanic and Regina cyclone were part of the historical invocation.  I spent nearly two hour with fourteen other cyclone enthusiasts stuck in an elevator so I chose a movement from my central collegiate suite called The Strong Winds Pass By.  I chose Bethany since its is reported that the orchestra of the Titanic played it as the ship sunk.  Serug was one of my singing songs and Hymn of Joy is a delight for improvisation.  I love the works of Larry Peterson one of our bell ringers with their play on words and shifting identity. 

         Lanigan is one of the most famous hymn tunes written by Lawrence Ritchey my teacher and musical director.  Let Us Break Bread Together exemplifies that community of spirit that the members of Knox Metropolitan church have extended to me and the bell ringers over the years.

 

 

 

F. Wayne Tunison

 

1.  Psalm of Approach # 31 And Variation                  

                                       F. Wayne Tunison (b.1953)

2.  Lanigan                 Lawrence  Ritchey (1939-2006)

3.  Scene From Behind               Larry John Peterson (b.1952)

4.  Death of Queen Jane               Traditional English

5.  Red Wing                                 Traditional American

6.  Central Collegiate Suite: Strong Winds Pass By  

                                       F. Wayne Tunison (b.1953)

7.  All Jolly Fellows that Follow The Plough                                         Traditional English

8.  Ten Bad Reasons To Love You

                                    Larry John Peterson (b.1952)

9.  Hymn Of Joy Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)

10. Spaghetti's Interlude             Larry John Peterson (b.1952)

11. Serug                     Wesley's "European Psalmist"

12. Administrative Pair of Ducks   F. Wayne Tunison (b.1953)

13. Boring For Oil                           Traditional Cowboy

14. Bethany                       Lowell  Mason (1792-1872)

15. Whorehouse Bells Were Ringing        Traditional Cowboy

16. Death and The Lady                Traditional English

17. Seen from Behind Larry John Peterson (b.1952)

18. Let Us Break Bread              American  Traditional

19. Amen For Mr. Blister's Critters         Gloria  Mundi (b.1806)

 

Testimonial of F. Wayne Tunison

 

The most influential teacher for my bell ringing was Laurence Ritchey.  When he assumed instruction of the bell apprentices demanded quality, allegiance to the traditions of bell ringing in general but also to those that F.N. Darke had desired and had drifted in the river of time.  Laurence was a great master of improvisation and passed that on to his protégés making it clear that variation was only polite and palatable when the original score was mastered. Laurence set the bell ringer pass mark at 100% and we achieved it.

 

I believe that I survived Ritchey and even flourished because Lee Zwall a previous bell ringer had showed me the ropes.  In addition, I did not face Ritchey alone. There were several apprentices with Arthur Thomson and Jim Pugh graduating at the same time as me.

 

Having learned the ropes gave me a taste for music which was fed by many but notably William Makohoniuk, Lloyd Blackman, Tudor Davies, Arthur Rivet and many gamelan players in Bali. Musical composition skills were gained from Sidney Carter, William Moore, R. Murray Schafer, and Thomas Schudel.  My eclectic appreciation of music was nurtured by David Johnson, Horst Hamm, Sandra Cosbey and Allan McFee of the CBC (Herb Roberts introduced us). 

 

When a bell ringer has an apprentice graduate, a symbiotic relationship often forms and I have experienced this with many of my apprentices.  The family Blachford displayed rich capabilities in many aspects of life, working with me to advance the Bell ringing Corporation, building the hand bell choirs and expanding repertoire, change ringing and style.  Larry Peterson proved an excellent and prolific composer pushing my meager efforts to higher levels. Sandra Cosbey and Carol Chernishenko lead our hand bell choirs to places I would not go. Some of my apprentices became better players than I which causes my heart to beam when I hear them play.  Patrick Johnson with his clever rhythms and brilliant improvisations and the ever increasing technical prowess of Trevor Anderson our youngest bell ringer gives me pride.

 

Testimonial of F. Wayne Tunison (continued)

 

I believe that my unique contribution to Regina bell ringing comes from my multi interdisciplinary art/engineering practice. As a teacher, I embraced the principles of adult learning and competency based instruction.  McGregor Hone endorsed and tempered my disturbing visual sense.  Jean Oser refined it with narrative, motion and multi-culturalism which I believe our original benefactor Darke would have been proud.  Michele Sereda added courage and adventure to my practice with femine grace and subtlety.

 

When I reflect on the changes I influenced; I see a repertoire expanded over a hundred fold, an art gallery giving a visual component to the bell tower, a bell choir with nearly four times the bells.  We also have an international reputation for the avant-garde, where else do you find; performance art and hand bells blended in a religious setting, mellow tubular bells ringing over a lake with children at the ropes, the only computers to crash at Y2K, water chimes and brass bands all appearing in the light of the traditions of the Darke Memorial Chimes.

Finally, I must recognize the continued love and support from the members of Knox Metropolitan United Church true custodians of bell ringing for our city.  There was continuous support of the Regina citizens both directly and through the various official channels of the civic and provincial governments. Many people supported the tower by joining our corporation or by physically giving support with donations of art, funds and labour but most of appreciation and love.

Testimonial of F. Wayne Tunison

 

The most influential teacher for my bell ringing was Laurence Ritchey.  When he assumed instruction of the bell apprentices demanded quality, allegiance to the traditions of bell ringing in general but also to those that F.N. Darke had desired and had drifted in the river of time.  Laurence was a great master of improvisation and passed that on to his protégés making it clear that variation was only polite and palatable when the original score was mastered. Laurence set the bell ringer pass mark at 100% and we achieved it.

 

I believe that I survived Ritchey and even flourished because Lee Zwall a previous bell ringer had showed me the ropes.  In addition, I did not face Ritchey alone. There were several apprentices with Arthur Thomson and Jim Pugh graduating at the same time as me.

 

Having learned the ropes gave me a taste for music which was fed by many but notably William Makohoniuk, Lloyd Blackman, Tudor Davies, Arthur Rivet and many gamelan players in Bali. Musical composition skills were gained from Sidney Carter, William Moore, R. Murray Schafer, and Thomas Schudel.  My eclectic appreciation of music was nurtured by David Johnson, Horst Hamm, Sandra Cosbey and Allan McFee of the CBC (Herb Roberts introduced us). 

 

When a bell ringer has an apprentice graduate, a symbiotic relationship often forms and I have experienced this with many of my apprentices.  The family Blachford displayed rich capabilities in many aspects of life, working with me to advance the Bell ringing Corporation, building the hand bell choirs and expanding repertoire, change ringing and style.  Larry Peterson proved an excellent and prolific composer pushing my meager efforts to higher levels. Sandra Cosbey and Carol Chernishenko lead our hand bell choirs to places I would not go. Some of my apprentices became better players than I which causes my heart to beam when I hear them play.  Patrick Johnson with his clever rhythms and brilliant improvisations and the ever increasing technical prowess of Trevor Anderson our youngest bell ringer gives me pride.

 

Testimonial of F. Wayne Tunison (continued)

 

I believe that my unique contribution to Regina bell ringing comes from my multi interdisciplinary art/engineering practice. As a teacher, I embraced the principles of adult learning and competency based instruction.  McGregor Hone endorsed and tempered my disturbing visual sense.  Jean Oser refined it with narrative, motion and multi-culturalism which I believe our original benefactor Darke would have been proud.  Michele Sereda added courage and adventure to my practice with femine grace and subtlety.

 

When I reflect on the changes I influenced; I see a repertoire expanded over a hundred fold, an art gallery giving a visual component to the bell tower, a bell choir with nearly four times the bells.  We also have an international reputation for the avant-garde, where else do you find; performance art and hand bells blended in a religious setting, mellow tubular bells ringing over a lake with children at the ropes, the only computers to crash at Y2K, water chimes and brass bands all appearing in the light of the traditions of the Darke Memorial Chimes.

Finally, I must recognize the continued love and support from the members of Knox Metropolitan United Church true custodians of bell ringing for our city.  There was continuous support of the Regina citizens both directly and through the various official channels of the civic and provincial governments. Many people supported the tower by joining our corporation or by physically giving support with donations of art, funds and labour but most of appreciation and love.